thehappysorceress:

always reblog

nattoki:

My first infographic, made on Adobe Illustrator. This was inspired by Hank Green’s video which looked at the data from a survey of Nerdfighters. 
I’ve been slaving away at this for a couple days, and I’m really happy with how it turned out! Plus, it was a fun way to learn how to use the tools of Illustrator.

nattoki:

My first infographic, made on Adobe Illustrator. This was inspired by Hank Green’s video which looked at the data from a survey of Nerdfighters. 

I’ve been slaving away at this for a couple days, and I’m really happy with how it turned out! Plus, it was a fun way to learn how to use the tools of Illustrator.

you-are-beautiphil-dan:

thistinybluebox:

juicey-criss:

klainebows21:

thedoctorwatchesthestars:

johngreensmoustache:

TODAY I FOUND A SIGNED TFIOS BOOK IN WATERSTONES. I have no idea where it came from and neither did the waterstones employee and LOOK IT’S ALL SNAZZY AND RED AND FABULOUS. I didn’t even know red editions existed or how rare they are but

LETS MAKE JOHN GREEN FIND THE THING

We need john green to explain the thing

Johnnnnn, you’re wanted

it’s sold at WATERStones

the-winchesters-boo:

He has the PERFECT wife.

"There were so many of us who would have to live with things done and things left undone that day. Things that did not go right, things that seemed okay at the time because we could not see the future. If only we could see the endless string of consequences that result from our smallest actions. But we can’t know better until knowing better is useless"

John Green (Looking for Alaska)

"…the story was about whether (and how) one can live a thoughtful, hopeful life in the face of unresolvable ambiguity."

John Green on Looking For Alaska (via epicjohngreenquotes)

Why Stuff Like Hair Color Is Not So Important to Me

fishingboatproceeds:

In today’s vlogbrothers video, Nat Wolff discusses all the feedback (a gentle word) he has received regarding his lack of blond hair in his role as Isaac in the movie The Fault in Our Stars

I noted that I couldn’t care less about such things (and in fact was THRILLED when Nat was cast as Isaac). So here’s why, and of course all of this is offered with the acknowledgement that I might be wrong.

1. The physical appearance of a character in a novel is not to me the most interesting or important facet of that character. So if you have a guy like Nat, who understands Isaac profoundly and has the ability to bring him to life but does not have blond hair, do you cast him over someone who will “look like” Isaac on a movie poster but not in fact be able to embody who Isaac is? I think not. We weren’t casting a movie poster. We were casting a movie, and we needed great actors who could portray complex characters convincingly. And that ain’t easy. Trust me. I tried acting today. It’s hard.

I think in the end hair color is not a huge part of who we are. Like, if you ask me to describe myself, I will say things like “husband” and “father” and “nerdfighter” and “person with anxiety problems” and “brother” and “Mountain Goats fan” and about 10,000 other things before I ever get to “brown hair haver.” 

1a. But on the other hand, I understand that when people are responding to casting news, the physical body is all they have to go on, because they have not seen the auditions, and that it’s a little unfair of me to be like, “Trust me, Nat Wolff is an amazing Isaac and who cares about his hair color.” And I get that. But trust me, Nat Wolff is an amazing Isaac. 

2. Movie adaptations are not, and should not attempt to be, visualizations of a novel. They are movies. They need different kinds of structure, and different metaphors* and different ways of expressing thoughts and ideas because you’re moving from text to the visible/audible world. EXAMPLE: In the book, Augustus Waters has blue eyes. Hazel at one point calls these eyes “waterblue,” and there are a bunch of little connections between Gus’s eyes and water, and that’s hopefully a nice little thing to help the reader think about the weird relationship that Hazel—and actually all humans—have with water. But to make that connection in the movie would be cheesy as hell, because everything is visible in a movie, and so that connection would lack any subtlety and it would just be obvious and distracting, and that’s why I honestly prefer that Ansel Elgort (who is playing Gus) doesn’t happen to have waterblue eyes. (That said, I would’ve lobbied the studio to cast him even if he did have blue eyes, because I thought he was a brilliant and nuanced Augustus.)

Physical appearance only matters if it is a significant plot point. Otherwise, no worries! :]

fishingboatproceeds:

Hazel and Gus with Henry and Alice — no, really!!!

effyeahnerdfighters:

An exclusive look at the TFiOS movie set has led to possibly the most adorable facebook album known to man: Shailene Woodley and Ansel Elgort help keep John Green’s children entertained while dad and mom tour the set.

Oh my goodness. Thank you, new and official tFiOS movie facebook page, for this gift to mankind. Thank you.

As if John isn’t making a cameo in the movie for real, and the Price of Dawn cover contest, and as if you couldn’t win a trip to the movie set yourself… I think Nerdfighteria might explode.

p.s.: this is FYNF’s 10,000th post!! joy and excitement about our blog

fishingboatproceeds:

Reblogging this from effyeahnerdfighters because you should all be following them.

But anyway, here Nat Wolff and I answer questions from the set of The Fault in our Stars movie.